Rand Paul on Rachel Maddow: Private Businesses Can Discriminate on Basis of Race



On February 1st, 1960, in Greensboro NC, four students from North Carolina A&T sat down at a “whites-only” Woolworth’s lunch counter and ask to be served. This action by David Richmond, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair, and Joseph McNeil ignited a wave of student sit-ins and protests that flashed like fire across the South. A fire for justice that no amount of beatings, jails, or firehoses, could extinguish. Until Rand Paul… Rand says, in effect, that the state can’t legislate against private businesses that discriminate. Is his wig on too tight?

Maddow: “How about desegregating lunch counters?” […]

Rand: “Does the owner of the restaurant own his restaurant or does the government own the restaurant?”

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Rand Paul on Rachel Maddow: Private Businesses Can Discriminate on Basis of Race

The Critic Underwater in Isabel Allende’s The Island Under the Sea

I generally prefer to leave evaluations of literary reviews for analysis in the classroom, in articles, or related venues, but I’m making an exception today. Isabel Allende’s _La Isla bajo el mar_ was a good read and, though I haven’t read the English translation, I was irked by Gaiutra Bahadur’s review in today’s _Times Sunday Book Review_. When the central criticism is “Where is the magical realism?,” you have to wonder about the critic’s knowledge of the tradition Allende is working with and against. In the review, its absence equals an inauthentic foray into a sanctioned formula that can presumably capture a missing “reality,” or worst, regional “truths.” Yikes. It reminded me of Andrei Codrescu’s review, also in the _Times_, of Roberto Fernández’s bilingually exquisite novel _Raining Backwards_ years ago when I was in graduate school. Cordrescu missed Fernández’s parody of the notion of modernist innovation by noting how the novel could have been improved if “the echoes of García Márquez [i.e., “magical realism”] had been made conscious,” as if the novel’s bilingualism weren’t a foil for modernist claims to universalism. What would I tell Bahadur? Simple: I hope your reviewers are more attentive to your work than you’ve been today to Allende in the pages of the _Times_.

See “All Souls Rising,” by GAIUTRA BAHADUR in today’s Sunday Book Review or on her blog

The Critic Underwater in Isabel Allende’s The Island Under the Sea